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post #1 of 7 Old 12-22-2003, 10:33 AM Thread Starter
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Check Engine Light

I have a 2000 C230 Kompressor with a little over 100K miles on it. The check engine light came on. Again. And again. This is the fourth time. The first three times, the dealer said it was the oxygen sensor, and they replaced it. Then they said there are two oxygen sensors, and they replaced the other one. Each time, only around 150 miles went by before the light came on again. According to CT law, I can press for the lemon law at this point, but I really don't want to have to go that route. It increases the inconvenience and frustration level even more.

What could it be? I think that it's something that relates to the sensors, more in line with perhaps a failure of the supercharger, but I'm just guessing at this point. Anyone have any ideas?

I talked to the dealer, and if I give them one more try they are willing to add an additional year/12000 miles to my warranty, which I think is very fair of them.
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post #2 of 7 Old 01-07-2004, 03:09 PM
 
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???

what makes you think the kompressor has anything to do with your check engine light. is there any grinding from the unit, charge pressure codes. etc? any information would be helpful...



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post #3 of 7 Old 01-07-2004, 04:03 PM Thread Starter
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I have no idea. As I stated, I am only guessing. There is no loss of functionality in the vehicle, in fact it runs great & I would just leave it alone, but in Massachusetts you fail inspection if the check engine light is on, regardless of the reason.
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post #4 of 7 Old 01-08-2004, 04:36 PM
 
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in most cases, a code that will trigger a check engine light will point the tech in the right direction or directly to the problem. i would be interested in seeing the sds printout of the codes stored in your vehicle's ME-SFI module. if you have a copy of those with your recpeipt from the dealership or can get ahold of them, post that info up on the forum and i will give you mine and some of my technician's opinions on the proper course of action. most often with your car there are 02 sensors (which you've dealt with already), self adaptaion codes (most often MAF sensor) or a few others. there aren't a lot of intangible problems on the m111 motor save for a few secondary air injection issues. whatever, get the codes and we'll go from there.



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post #5 of 7 Old 01-09-2004, 06:29 AM Thread Starter
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I'll stop by the dealer today & see if I can get them. If I do, I'll post them tonight.
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post #6 of 7 Old 04-23-2007, 07:45 PM
 
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Tips

Keeping the oxygen sensor fresh may improve your Mercedes' fuel economy as much as 10%-15% (which can save $100 each year in fuel costs on average). Keeping the oxygen sensor in good operating condition will also minimize exhaust emissions, reduce the risk of costly damage to the catalytic converter and ensure peak engine performance (no surging or hesitating).

For these reasons, the oxygen sensor should be considered a "tune-up" replacement item just like spark plugs, especially on older vehicles (those built before the mid-1990s).
Bosch oxygen sensors are an exact replacement for the original (OEM/OES). The construction, number of wires and connectors are the same as the OE, which eliminates the risks associated with splicing and crimping wires (required for many "universal" replacement oxygen sensors).

Some three- or four-wire universal oxygen sensors also do not have the same heater circuit watt ratings as the OE sensor, which may cause driveability and emissions problems in your Mercedes. There is also a potential for damaging the computer and/or oxygen sensor if a multiwire universal sensor is connected incorrectly. The lack of standardization of wire colors increases the risk of an incorrect installation.

So, when it comes time to replace your Mercedes' oxygen sensor, there's no question that you'll get the best fit and performance from the OE oxygen sensors built by Bosch.
Heed these tips and your Mercedes is well on its way to passing emissions with flying colors and saving you money in fuel costs and repair bills:

Tip #1: Increased fuel consumption, driveability problems (hesitation or surging), "Check Engine Light" lit or emissions test failure could all be signs of an oxygen sensor in need of replacement.

Tip #2: An additional consequence of any oxygen sensor failure may be damage to your Mercedes' catalytic converter - a very expensive way to find out your oxygen sensor needs replacement!

Tip #3: Checking the operation of the oxygen sensor and feedback control system should always be a priority anytime a vehicle fails an emissions test due to high HC or CO.

Tip #4: Keeping your Mercedes' oxygen sensor(s) fresh may improve fuel economy as much as 10%-15% (which can save $100 each year in fuel costs on average). Keeping the sensor in good operating condition will also minimize exhaust emissions, reduce the risk of costly damage to the catalytic converter and ensure peak engine performance (no surging or hesitating).
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post #7 of 7 Old 04-23-2007, 07:54 PM
 
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OS

The O2 sensor is located under the car, threaded in a hole on the exhaust pipe with the sensor wires running through a hole in the floorboard. It is a DIY job if you feel so inclined. There should be a thread somewhere about using the sensor from a Mustang 5.0 sensor (made by Bosch) that will work perfectly with a little surgery on the wire harness. You could also check www.oxygensenors.com. They sell the whole kit (instructions, wire crimps, heat shrink tubing) and USPS shipping for $40.
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