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After leaving my car parked for three weeks I get in to start it up and the clutch pedal flops to the floor and stays there. What gives? Another post mentions a reservoir. Help! 1975 240D
 

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did u check the fluid level? if its full u might have air inside the system. try clutching with your hand several times with the engine on. if the pedal does not go up lift it up with yur hand. if it does not work yull have to check the pump
 

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:oops: I have to admit that I have never before owned a car, mercedes or otherwise, that had a hydrolic clutch. So where do I check the fluid level at?
 

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its a reservoir thats veeeery near from where the brake's reservoir is, if you place your view towards the engine bay, the clutch reservoir should be at the right side of the break fluid reservoir. its not very big, fill the clutch reservoir with break fluid.
 

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Check the rubber on top of the Master cylinder.....where you push the pedal down.
If it's leaking replace or rebuild it....also there is a Slave cylinder on the tranny Bell housing,mst people replace it at the same time.
Not that bad of a job.
 

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Hey, thanks to both of you.
There is no sign of leakage aroung the master cylinder but I will replace it along with the slave cylinder just in case.
Something odd: The line from the back of the master cylinder travels through the firewall and directly into the brake reservoir. It does not have it's own separate reservoir as it shows in a Mercedes-Benz catalog that I found for the model 115. Nothing is cobbled, though. It looks factory.
 

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Aba, Clutch systems are SUPPOSED to be sealed systems. Leaking is not normal. Jess, the most likely place is the seals in the clutch master or slave. The slave will be mounted on the tranny. It will be obvious how it works. I'm not familiar with your specific car but there should be a dust boot over the working end of the slave. Any fluid under the dust cover indicates a leak. You might not see the master leak since the ends are out of sight and the master can leak internally. IYf you infact diagnose a bad master or slave, you may want to change both at the same time. Replacing 1 tends to increase pressure & make the other leak. Old school is to buy a cylinder hone & replace seals. If you get a reman unit, buy name brand quality else you'll likely be doing it again soon. New is best but the price differential between new & reman may tempt you.
 
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