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hello, the dealer is super expensive, just wondering if I get my own oil and do it myself will I need special tools? Do they use something that is not readily available?

also, does it have to be European oil or a special European formula, as stated here:
searchforparts.com/oil-change/mercedes-benz-2019-a220-2.0l-260.920-turbo

of course I will not use some generic oil but maybe there were special items/fluids involved at the dealer making it so expensive?
 

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The dealer charges an arm and a leg because people will pay it. I have a '16 E550 and use Amsoil Signature Series 10W-30, plus some other stuff to thicken it up because I think 10W and 30 is too thin for me. Part of the reason I broke down and spent the extra $ for that oil is because it's a turbo motor, and very expensive if something happens to it. I didn't choose the Euro oil they sell because it's only available in 0 and 5W. Actually I wouldn't buy the euro anyway because I doubt it's as good, or at best it's the same.
I think it was $10/qt and free shipping from Amsoil but you have to pay $10 for a 6 month membership, so to take advantage of that I bought enough oil for a few changes.
Filters are likely available anywhere but I'm wary since most just seem lame. Probably only a couple places that actually make the filters anyway so I got a Hengst ($16) with the white fluffy fleece I like. Kinda spendy imo but the cheapos aren't much better. I'd imagine the dealer charges twice that and it's likely the same exact filter.
Not sure about your car but mine was rather easy to change the oil. Actually it wasn't but only because it was a lot harder than I expected to raise the car. I had to make long custom ramps from wood because regular ramps will hit the air dam long before the tire, plus all the ramps for sale look sketchy and I'm not getting under the car unless its solid. You can jack it up but also sketchy imo because they don't have nice spots to put a jack. Instead they have these spots where the hand crank jack in the trunk goes and a regular floor jack may damage them, which I have seen. Once up on the ramps I had to remove the plastic covers under the eng which isn't hard but is annoying. Then it was easy to get the pan bolt out and drain. Mine holds like 9qts so a regular 5qt or so pan won't cut it. You can make one using a box lined with one or two trash bags, or a regular pan and stop half way to drain the pan or however, just be ready. People often spill the oil when they first pull the plug because it basically shoots out at first because oil is so thin these days. So be ready on your first time, and maybe lay some cardboard out in case you aren't as ready as you thought you were.
Replace the plug and be wary the copper gasket is seated like it was before, or just use a new one. I then fill via the oil cap, check for leaks and put whatever covers etc back on. Reset the oil service interval on the dash and you're good to go, but after running it a bit double check the level via the dipstick.
I do some extra stuff too but you don't need to. Like the last couple qts I put in the oil filter hole with the hopes it'll fill those passages and take less time for the eng to get oil on startup. Can't hurt... I often soak the filter too because otherwise your pumped oil has to do that first as well. I also top the oil level to the max line or a bit more, which some say is bad but I do not believe it for a second. Each motor is different but they usually take a good bit more before it's an issue.
I also have the car slightly tilted to the drain plug side to better flush particles on the bottom out. I drain it while still pretty hot so it drains quicker, for the same reason., Then I spray carb cleaner in the drain hole to help flush out whatever crud on the bottom that didn't come out with the oil. Many places suck the oil out the dipstick hole, which imo is lame, lazy and won't flush out that bottom crap.
I also put a magnet on the end of the drain plug to catch stuff while it's running. I use the biggest neodymium magnet I can find that fits. This is easy if you have an alum pan, but if you have a steel pan the magnet will try to stick to the pan and you'll never git back out. In those cases I epoxy the magnet to the drain plug. My special draining ritual probably does little on a newer MB but it's a habit for me, especially after all the crap in the oil of various other engines.
One pain of doing it yourself is getting rid of the old oil. At least in my area/state the auto parts stores are supposed to accept used oil but they way they get around it is they always say their tank is full. Bastards... So you may want to find a place that will take it, that actually takes it. I have a place which is very close and they actually take it every time. They charge 25cents/gal but omg so worth it.
It may sound like a pain to some people but I end up knowing I have better oil in it, at least the same or better filter, the pan is cleaner, likely less dry start time and I'm done in less time. Time considering driving to said place, waiting to have it done, driving back. I'm probably done at home before the dealer would've started working on it. I'm not sure what they charge but I guess I spend ~$100-110? Amsoil and others have cheaper oil so I could shave off maybe $40, but I'm not willing to do that.
:)
 
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