Benz Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
my duck hunting buddy from lake charles was diagnosed with lukemia today. he is 42. he has had lingering bruises for 2 years and had them checked today (try getting an oilfield coonass to the doctor if he didn't get hurt on the rig......). he has likely had the disease for 2 years. his white cell count was down to 10. starts chemo next week.

i thought lukemia was more common in kids through 14, then folks beyond 70? has anyone else known a middle-ager to develop lukemia?

when i was 18 a 15 year old at my church was diagnosed and died in 3 weeks.

just curious. still in shock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Sorry to read that...

I don't know anyone with adult leukemia, but it has to do with the instability (mutation) of mtDNA. I think it's the same as somatic DNA?

Rib??
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
357 Posts
There are many variations of it some can be cured with Leukoscan with is a fairly conservitive procedure but leukemia is very bad news I know two people that had it and it took both of their lives.

sorry to hear the bad news. :cry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
I dimly recall that there are several varieties. I assume that mtDNA would be mitochondrial DNA which is indeed, somatic DNA matrilineally inherited. Is there a matrilineal component to any form of leukemia?

If there's not a doctor in the house who drives an M-B (oh yeah, I believe that), I'll do some research for you. We have access to biomed databases at work.

Uh, as a liability precaution for any lurking physician, explaining about a disease is not the same as diagnosing it, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I know a little about adult leukemia, my Mom was diagnose at 48, she lasted about 6 months. If I recalled correctly, she suffered from two forms of leukemia simultaneously. The doctors at M.D. Anderson put her through one hell of a chemo program and were able to knock the leukemia into remission in just a couple months. Unfortunately she came down with a cold, just a simple common cold and the beast came back with a vegence. Things went very fast at that point - 4 days.

No real reason why but the doctors suspected that it could have had something to do with the numerous X-rays she had as child in the 30's. Their line of thinking was the radiation possibly mutated her genes. Who knows, X-rays were still sorta new then. The doctors were certain though that the forms of leukemia she had could not be inherited. Not that I distrust the doctors, but I do worry a little.

Granted nowadays that many people can beat leukemia, even adult leukemia. One of my training instructors at the academy was diagnosed in the early 80's. The same doctors at M.D. Anderson whipped his leukemia into remission, a remission that lasted nearly 20 years. We became friends and I even had the opportunity to work with him later in my career. The leukemia did return to claim him, but after he had retired.

His 20 years of new life sure beat my Mom's few months. Progress has been made. Just don't let your friend give up hope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
In high school, my best friends' father died of this disease in his early 60s. He was diagnosed about 15 years prior.

He underwent chemo and it went into remission. Those "disease free" years were a healthy and productive time for him. When it came back, he was sick for about 6 months before he died. My buddy rarely talks about it, so I don't know much more.

Besides being a genetic mutation of the mitchondrial (mother's) DNA, there has been some links to lack a certain protein-- but that's still being researched.

BTW: Narwhal, this is the guy I told you about who recently moved to Boston with a fresh law degree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies. Bobby starts chemo on Monday. 5 days in a row once a month for 6 months. I have never heard of a protocol like that, but it seems to be encouraging that they aren't looking for a marrow donor yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Sorry to hear this news. I suppose no one's immune to disease like this at any time.

My step-cousin got the disease in his twenties. The best guess the doctors gave was that he may have gotten it from breathing some of the chemicals attatched to his dry-cleaned laundry.

Since his diagnosis, I've been tested and am on a national registry so that if anyone in the country needs a bone marrow transplant and I come up as a match, I can give.

My cousin, John, lasted a couple years before the disease claimed him. Pretty sad too, because he had gotten married and had two boys.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top